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First Look at the USA-Exclusive Grand Seiko Seasons Collection (Refs. SBGH271, SBGH273, SBGA413, and SBGA415)

First Look at the USA-Exclusive Grand Seiko Seasons Collection (Refs. SBGH271, SBGH273, SBGA413, and SBGA415)

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Grand Seiko’s plans and general style are regularly supposed to be motivated by the nature. We see this in the “Snowflake,” maybe their most notable watch, with a dial made to bring to mind delicately windblown fields of day off. At that point there’s the Mt. Iwate dial, presently in different tones, with fine edges emanating from the middle that, when they get the light perfectly, emulate the Japanese mountains that can be seen from the Grand Seiko studio where these dials are produced.

Now, with four new lasting increments to the collection dependent on the seasons presented at the new Couture Time occasion in Las Vegas, Grand Seiko makes another move to laying guarantee as the luxury watchmaker that is immovably planted in the regular world.  

The Seasons Collection comprises of four watches, addressing spring, summer, fall, and winter. Spring and Winter use Spring Drive developments, while Summer and Fall are fueled by Hi-Beat mechanical types.  


Refs. SBGH271 and SBGH273 (Summer and Fall)

  • Case Material: impeccable steel
  • Dial: Green (with gold accents), Blue
  • Dimensions: 40mm
  • Crystal: Sapphire
  • Water Resistance: 100 meters
  • Movement: Hi-Beat 9S85 caliber
  • Strap/bracelet: Bracelet
  • Price: $6,300
  • Expected Release: Summer 2019

SBGA413 and SBGA415 (Spring and Winter)

  • Case Material: Titanium
  • Dial: Light pink, white
  • Dimensions: 40mm
  • Crystal: Sapphire
  • Water Resistance: 100 meters
  • Movement: 9R65 Spring Drive caliber
  • Strap/bracelet: bracelet
  • Price: $6,300
  • Expected Release: Summer 2019

Let’s tackle the Hi-Beats first. The green and blue dials of Summer and Fall (references SBGH271 and SBGH273, individually) are quietly finished, and intended to address the lavish greenery of the tallness of summer and cool, twilight fall evenings. The cases are in tempered steel and measure 40mm across, and utilize Grand Seiko’s 62GS case plan, which is an extraordinary return for devotees of the brand’s soonest pieces. This is an exemplary case shape that feels formal and to some degree extravagant, and when coordinated with a similar exceptionally cleaned and incredibly intelligent hour records and hands that Grand Seiko is known for (in an excellent yellow gold on the mid year model), you are left with an exemplary dress watch that successfully rides the line between saved from across the room, however compelling to look at when on the wrist.

The SBGA415 is the winter reference, and this one totally expands on the subjects in the vaunted and present day exemplary Snowflake (reference SBGA211). Furnished with a Spring Drive development, the smooth compass of the seconds hand across a picaresque Japanese snow scene stays the enthusiastic standard, however the dial has a surface that’s more detailed and quickly unique than the more established reference. On the off chance that the SBGA211 is a peaceful, desolate, snow covered scene, the more current rendition is more similar to a snowstorm in progress.

Like the Summer and Fall releases, reference SBGA415 utilizes the legacy 62GS structure factor as a beginning stage for case plan, yet the Winter variation is projected in lightweight titanium (just like the Spring watch). There’s a cohesiveness here to the line that I believe is significant, and furthermore particularly part of ongoing Grand Seiko custom. We’ve seen other high perceivability Spring Drive watches in titanium, which is from numerous points of view a more current approach to make a watch that finds a place with the high level development. The Hi-Beat in steel, then again, addresses the conservative ethos of Grand Seiko. It’s straightforward, customary watchmaking that has quite recently been done very well with huge loads of care.

The Spring variation, reference SBGA413, is maybe the masterpiece of the pack, and addresses something that’s really unique for the brand. Utilizing similar sort of dial surface as its Spring Drive kin, the Spring watch is done in a light shade of pink, representing the cherry blooms that bring sightseers from everywhere the world to Japan each year. This watch feels like not just an extraordinary illustration of Grand Seiko’s watchmaking, however a profoundly felt accolade for a significant piece of Japanese culture. The cherry bloom is regularly seen as an illustration for the short lived nature of all life. Each spring, the cherry blooms blossom, momentarily changing a significant part of the Japanese scene, and as fast as they show up, they’re gone. It’s fundamental to appreciate them while you can. Stretching out this representation to a watch appears to be staggeringly normal for Grand Seiko.

All watches in the Seasons collection convey a rundown cost of $6,300, and are restrictive to US-based retailers. They are lasting pieces of the Grand Seiko index, be that as it may, and should start hitting stores later this late spring. Grand Seiko